Alcohol Use

Excessive Alcohol Use

Nearly 6,700 New Yorkers die each year due to excessive alcohol use, shortening the lives of those who die by an average of 24 years. Excessive alcohol use includes binge drinking, heavy drinking, and any alcohol use by pregnant persons or anyone younger than 21.

Excessive alcohol use can lead to both short- and long-term health issues. Short-term harms include injuries such as motor vehicle injuries or drowning; violence including homicide, suicide, sexual assault, and intimate partner violence; alcohol poisoning; and poor birth outcomes. Over time, alcohol use can lead to chronic diseases such as heart disease, liver disease, digestive problems, and several types of cancer. Excessive alcohol use can also lead to learning and memory problems, mental health problems, social problems such as lost productivity or family problems, and alcohol use disorders.

To reduce the risk of alcohol-related harms, the 2020–2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults of legal drinking age can choose not to drink, or to drink in moderation by limiting intake to 2 drinks or less in a day for men or 1 drink or less in a day for women, on days when alcohol is consumed.

Alcohol Surveillance and Epidemiology Program

The New York State Alcohol Surveillance and Epidemiology Program (ASEP) was established in September 2021 through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to conduct public health surveillance on excessive alcohol use and its related harms in New York State. The Alcohol Surveillance and Epidemiology Program works in partnership with the New York State Office of Addiction Services and Supports (OASAS).

The goal of the ASEP is to reduce excessive alcohol use and its related harms through:

  • Monitoring and sharing data on excessive alcohol use and its related harms to inform prevention efforts
  • Developing partnerships with state and local entities to collaborate on prevention efforts
  • Increasing awareness about the public health impact of excessive alcohol use among partners and the public
  • Building support for population-based policy and environmental changes to reduce excessive alcohol use

The Alcohol Surveillance and Epidemiology Workgroup (ASEW) is a network of data experts and prevention partners brought together to examine the patterns, context, and impact of excessive alcohol use in New York State. Please email AlcoholData@health.ny.gov if you are interested in joining.

Alcohol Surveillance and Epidemiology Program Newsletters

Data Resources

Annual Reports

Information for Action Reports

Prevention Resources