Drinking Water Response Activities to Address Local Water Supply Concerns

Last Update: October 27, 2017
The following is information about response activities by the New York State Department of Health to address local water supply concerns.
More information about PFOA in drinking water in Hoosick Falls

Ongoing State Health Department Activities

The State Health Department has been conducting activities in New York State communities in response to local water supply issues and concerns. Activities include:

  • Consultation and advice to address community water supply issues
  • Drinking water testing for affected public and private water supplies
  • Activities to characterize and address exposures

Community Resources

PFOA Biomonitoring (Blood Sampling) Program

Online survey tools for communities facing PFOA/PFOS contamination

DOH has launched this online survey tool for communities across the state facing PFOA/PFOS contamination. The survey asks questions about residential history, drinking water consumption, occupational history, and health conditions. This survey will help the Department gather information from current residents as well as former residents who may have moved out of the community and were not able to participate in previous community surveys. The information collected will help identify exposure, risk factor and disease patterns in these communities.

Survey results and individual data collected will remain confidential. Only group results will be made public.

Online survey tools:

PFOS in Drinking Water in Newburgh Area

PFOA in Drinking Water in Hoosick/Hoosick Falls

PFOA in Drinking Water in Petersburgh

A Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) filtration system has been installed on the Petersburgh municipal public water system that is effectively removing PFOA from water before it enters the system. Repeated testing throughout the municipal public water system has shown that PFOA has been reduced to non-detectable levels. Normal use of the water will clear PFOA from your household plumbing, but if you prefer, you can choose to flush your indoor plumbing, fixtures, and appliances.

PFOA in Drinking Water in Washington County

Fish Testing for Perfluorinated Chemicals (PFCs)

The New York State Departments of Health (DOH) and Environmental Conservation (DEC) are working together to collect, analyze, and evaluate fish from water bodies around the Newburgh and Hoosick Falls areas for a group of chemicals called PFCs (this includes PFOA and PFOS). For more information, please visit Fish Testing for Perfluorinated Chemicals (PFCs).

Additional Information and Research

Letters to Municipalities

New York State News

For More Information

Water Quality Hotline: 800-801-8092 (Monday - Friday: 8:30 am - 4:30 pm)

For specific questions about potential health effects:

  • Email: btsa@health.ny.gov, phone: 518-402-7800 (Monday - Friday: 8:30 am - 4:30 pm), or write: State Health Department, Bureau of Toxic Substance Assessment, Corning Tower, Room 1743, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12237

For specific questions about the public water supply:

  • Email: bpwsp@health.ny.gov, phone: 518-402-7650 (Monday - Friday: 8:30 am - 4:30 pm), or write: State Health Department Bureau of Water Supply Protection, Corning Tower, Room 1110, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12237

For specific questions about private wells:

  • Email: beei@health.ny.gov, phone: 518-402-7860 (Monday - Friday: 8:30 am - 4:30 pm), or write: State Health Department Bureau of Environmental Exposure Investigation, Corning Tower, Room 1717, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12237

For specific questions about blood testing:

  • Email: beoe@health.ny.gov, phone: 518-402-7950 (Monday - Friday: 8:30 am - 4:30 pm), or write: State Health Department Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology, Corning Tower, Room 1203, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12237